Two days of hiking in Abruzzo National Park

We’ve just done a couple of days of hiking in Abruzzo National Park, in the central Apennines of Italy. We stayed at the small town of Pescasseroli, a very friendly place located in the centre of the park and at an elevation of around 1150m.

We followed a couple of routes from the Lonely Planet book Hiking in Italy by Brendan Sainsbury. We caught a bus direct from Rome to Pescasseroli, then just started our walks in the town.

Day 1 – short walk above Pescasseroli

We headed out of the town into a valley to the west. This is path B3, which climbs from pasture and into pine forest on the hillside. On the map we used, the hill and ridge are called Bocca di Forno – “The Oven’s Mouth”.

Pine forest near Pescasseroli, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The path curved around the hillside, continuing through pine forest, with some clearings that were full of flowers and butterflies.

The path then descended into the ruins of Castel Mancino, a mysterious 10th-11th century fortress that fell into disuse then became a source of building stones for the village below. Seeing the first ruined tower among the pine trees was like something out of Skyrim. Fab.

Castel Mancino, near Pescasseroli, Abruzzo

And here’s Fran in an archway right on the hilltop. The masonry to the right, just out of the picture, looked like it’d collapse if you so much as gently prodded it…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 2 – Rocca Ridge

This was our main walk. Sainsbury gives his route at 19.5km, but we finished it by looping back onto part of the path we followed yesterday, heading for a bar by a more scenic route, so we did around 22km (about 13.5 miles).

 

 

 

 

We headed up a valley due south of Pescasseroli, onto path C1, then, leaving behind a farm, onto path C3. The whole landscape here is shaped by transhumance, and we immediately encounterd a herd of white cows grazing among the beech trees by Rifugio della Difesa. There were guarded by a very professional Maremmano who barked at us until we were a decent distance beyong the herd.

Path C3 takes you up through beatiful beech forest, which reminded me of the Amon Hen woodland where Frodo separates himself from the Fellowship in the denouement the first film in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. New Zealand beech (Nothofagus) is in an entirely different botanical family to European beech (Fagus) though.

baffling hieroglyphs on the Rocca Ridge trails, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although most of these trails are fairly well blazed, especially in the woods, occasionally the markings can be baffling, never mind the fact that the colour coding changes and the route names seem to be being revised. (This pic is probably out of order, can’t remember specifically where it was.)

We continued on, past the slightly sorry church of Santa Maria di Monte Tranquillo (at around 1600m), then up to a high pasture at the fairly derelict, private Rifugio (shelter) di Monte Tranquillo. There, four people on horses passed us, with the leader going all cowboy and chasing a grazing herd higher up the mountainside.

Mountaintop cowboy, Rifugio di Monte Tranquillo, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although it’s hard to capture with a photograph, things got a bit steeper here as we climbed up around Monte Pietroso (1876m).

Rocca Ridge

Fran, who has a kind of steep-slopes-vertigo, suddenly found herself facing one of her worst fears. Even though she’d chosen the route… clearly named “Rocca Ridge” in the book. (Another of her worst fears is formidable dogs. She’s even quite nervous around cows. So, so far, the walk was going well, challenging her fears and phobias!). The path up round Pietroso isn’t clear, but soon you reach the ridge itself.
Rocca Ridge, La Rocca, Abruzzo

Shortly after we got up to the highest point of the walk, La Rocca itself, with the 1924m summit marked by a cairn.

We continued along the ridge, heading north along path C5. Fran pushed the pace here as she wanted off. Steep slopes on both sides weren’t an ideal birthday present. (I won’t even mention her anxiety about thunder storms.) It was a fabulous walk though, with flowers everywhere,  including several types of geranium, greater celandine, wild thymes, several types of euphorbia, viper’s bugloss (love that name; it’s great in Italian too – viperina azzurra. Nicer thatn Echium vulgare) and many many others, like wild chives. I never realised chives liked mountaintops that are covered in snow and ice for several months of the year.wild chives, Rocca Ridge, Abruzzo

And gentians. Such an amazing colour.

gentians on the Rocca Ridge walk, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were even the remants of some snow. If you look at one of the pics above, the beech forest seems to be tinged in Autumnal red, but this is actually withered and dying leaves – I suspect the spring growth was hit by some late snow-fall.

last of the winter snows, Rocca Ridge, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And some more rugged mountain horses. I’ve never seen horses as sure-footed and mountain goat-like as these.
Horses on Rocca Ridge, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

Although there are a few dozen brown bears left in the area, wolves, golden eagles, and allegedly even lynx, our wildlife encounters included some raptors (possibly Buteo buteo, the common buzzard), innumerable butterflies and other insects enjoying the flowers, and swifts whistling around our ears on the ridge. Best of all, however, was thisVulpes vulpes specimen, who came jogging along the the ridge path from the other direction.

A fox, Vulpes vulpes, on the Rocca Ridge path, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We thought he’d run off when saw us, but he kept getting closer, until he stopped at our feet, like a pet dog expecting a treat. I suspect hikers do feed the foxes, hence the behaviour, but it was still a wonderful moment, as foxes are among my favourite animals. I even thought about patting him like a dog until the word “rabies” popped into my mind. He was a very healthy looking specimen though, so it was probably just my turn to be paranoid.

Rifugio di Lorio, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We eventually left the ridge at Rifugio di Lorio (padlocked – apparently you have to get the keys from the park authorities. Which seems pretty silly, to have a shelter you can’t access if you’re caught in a storm). I had a flapjack break, then we started the descent.

Path B4, dropped to the east, took us back into the beech forest and onto path B1, though this seemed to be called something else on the blazes (R7?), just to confuse things.

Beech forest below Rifugio di Lorio, near Pescasseroli, Abruzzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We even subsequently saw a small, weathered sign pinned to a tree that said we weren’t even supposed to have walked C5, the ridge route, without a guide, as part of the bear conservation programme. Maybe having some info on the park website, pinning the signs at both ends of the park, and, oh, opening the tourist office, might have been a better way to disseminate this info. Presumably none of the other half-dozen hikers we’d seen on the path had received this info either. So Italian.

We descended through the forest, past some ski facilities (absurd looking without snow), then back onto part of the path we’d done yesterday, under the castle ruins. I was craving a beer, but when we finally made it to Pescasseroli’s only birreria they only had foreign muck and industrial beer, so I forwent that essential part of any hike and settled instead for an aperitivo later. Aperitivo Pescasseroli

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We were joined by another Marammano, presumably retired. These guys are ubiquitious in Pescasseroli, wandering to the streets blagging stuzzichini (aperitivo snacks).

All in all, a great walk. Despite Fran’s uncertainties. Soon forgotten, after a glass and a half of prosecco. (Only a half – a big dog barged the table, smashing the glasss, before Fran could finish her second one.)

We concluded the day with one of the best meals we’ve had in Italy.

 

 

(Apologies – the pics are mostly taken on my rubbish phone’s 5MP camera I’m afraid. Fran is the real photographer with the proper DSLR. Maybe she’ll put some on Flickr at some point, and I can link to them.)

Advertisements

11 Comments

Filed under Italy, Main thread

11 responses to “Two days of hiking in Abruzzo National Park

  1. Pingback: Flapjack action photos | Bread, Cakes And Ale

  2. Michael

    Fantastic walks and pics. I look forward to seeing Fran’s. Am already jealous. The Lake District might be tame in comparison

  3. In some ways, possibly not unlike the Lakes in that it’s an area that’s been heavily altered by humanity. Just a little higher (Scafell is 978m).

  4. Catherine

    Amazing scenery, and beautiful flowers too. Loved your pictures Dan, Fran’s are great too. Your flapjacks look like a much better option to Kendal mint cake for a mountain hike!

  5. Hopefully Fran will put some pictures online soon. The flowers were amazing, and she got some good pics of them. And the butterflies, and similar related creatures that we need to identify.

    Can’t say I miss Kendal mint cake!

  6. Pingback: Dinner at Plistia restaurant, Pescasseroli, Abruzzo | Bread, Cakes And Ale

  7. Pingback: Biga 1: Advice from the maestro at Il Vecchio Forno, Pescasseroli | Bread, Cakes And Ale

  8. Elizabeth

    Hi just come back from visiting molise. Really lovely countryside but felt so inaccessible. Wanted to do some walking but didn’t no where to start. Then thought about national parks and read your diary on abrazzo . Will definitely return and have a go at walking there. Thanks for that.

    Ps
    Just had a discussion with my husband about Fran’s’phobias’ . I Don’t think fran has any phobias, perfectly reasonable fears under the circumstances. I would be just the same! However I would have been totally terrified by a fox!
    Kind regards
    Elizabeth

  9. massimiliano crea

    Salve, la Regione Abruzzo sta realizzando una guida sul trekking destinata alle famiglie. La foto con i ruderi di castel Mancino a Pescasseroli potrebbe fare al caso nostro. Ce la fa pubblicare e a quali condizioni?

    Grazie
    Massimiliano Crea

  10. massimiliano crea

    Se ce la fa pubblicare ci può mandare l’alta risoluzione della foto?

    Grazie

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s